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SUMMARIZING, PARAPHRASING, AND QUOTING: PARAPHRASING

This LIbGuide has three main objectives: 1. Demonstrate with clear definitions the differences between summarizing, paraphrasing and quoting. 2. Provide strategies and examples to show students how to incorporate research in their writing. 3. Encourage

INTRODUCTION

Welcome to the Kendall Paraphrasing LibGuide! You will find some examples, tips, and ways to practice paraphrasing to incorporate into your writing.

If you would like a quick rundown of summarizing, please visit this page.

HOW TO PARAPHRASE A PARAGRAPH

WHAT IS A PARAPHRASE?

WHAT IS A PARAPHRASE?                                                                                             

A paraphrase focuses on a specific idea or details in your own words. 

CHARACTERISTICS OF A SUMMARY                                                                           

  • Must be about the same length of the original source
  • Only focuses on a main idea
  • It provides the same amount of detail as the original source

WHY SUMMARIZE?                                                                                                        

Paraphrasing is helpful for two reasons:

  1. The original source is not the best way to explain how its information fits your argument
  2. Certain parts of a source are too long to be quoted.

PARAPHRASING VS. QUOTING

PARAPHRASE EXAMPLE

ORIGINAL SOURCE                                                                                                        

1. “I think the very idea of character, of developing not just grit, but empathy and curiosity, emotional intelligence.”

2. “Grit is typically about an overarching, generally abstract goal that motivates everything that you do.”

PARAPHASING EXAMPLE                                                                                               

1.  Duckworth suggests to view grit as a charactersitics that evolves over time.

2. Grit is not a characteristic that one exhibits once, but an overall way of acting when faced with situations in general.

COMPLETE CITATION                                                                                                    

Martin, R. (Host). (2016, May 1). Forget Talent, Success Comes From ‘Grit’

[Radio broadcast episode]. In Sunday Edition. Washington DC: National Public Radio.

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CITING A PARAPHRASE

There are two ways to cite a summary:

1

  • Begin by using a signal phrase or the name of the author.
  • Include a parenthetical citation with the year next to the author’s name.
  • Include a page or page numbers if possible.
  • Include your source in the reference list.

 


2

  • Include a parenthetical citation with the author’s last name, year at the end of the summary.
  • Include a page or page numbers if possible.
  • Include your source in the reference list.

 

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