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SUMMARIZING, PARAPHRASING, AND QUOTING: QUOTING

This LIbGuide has three main objectives: 1. Demonstrate with clear definitions the differences between summarizing, paraphrasing and quoting. 2. Provide strategies and examples to show students how to incorporate research in their writing. 3. Encourage

INTRODUCTION

Welcome to the Kendall Summarizing LibGuide! You will find some examples, tips, and ways to practice quotes to incorporate into your writing.

If you would like a quick rundown of quotations, please visit this page.

WHAT IS A QUOTE?

WHAT IS A QUOTE?                                                                                                        

You are quoting when you use your source’s words directly to support your writing.

CHARACTERISTICS OF A QUOTE                                                                                

  • It is the author’s exact words enclosed in quotation marks
  • The citing style changes with the length of the quote.
  • You must clarify whose words you are using
  • If altered, it clearly shows the changes you made

WHY QUOTE?                                                                                                                

Reasons why you might want to use your source’s words are:

  • The author adds credibility to your writing
  • The author’s words will knock out your reader (the quote is the K.O. punch)
  • The words are perfect, and paraphrasing might change the meaning

HOW TO INCORPORATE QUOTES WHEN WRITING

USING QUOTATIONS: THE BIG PICTURE


Every time you use a quote you must have:

  1. A signal phrase
  2. A quotation
  3. An in-text citation
  4. An explanation of the quote

CHECK FOR SKILLS

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MAKING CHANGES TO A QUOTE

KEEP CALM


  • Always use quotation marks at the beginning and the end of your quote.
  • When adding words to the quote to clarify, use brackets to show these words are yours.
  • Use ellipsis marks if you are cutting the quote short to show that you omitted some words.

ORIGINAL QUOTE                                                                                                        

“I think the very idea of character, of developing not just grit, but empathy and curiosity, emotional intelligence - you know, the things that I want my own daughters to develop, the idea that we're going to get there through rewards and punishments seems completely at odds with the idea of character itself.” – Angela Duckworth

EDITED QUOTE                                                                                                          

“I think the very idea [developing] of character… [and] the idea that we're going to get there through rewards and punishments seems completely at odds with the idea of character itself” (as mentioned in Martin, 2016).

COMPLETE REFERENCE                                                                                         

Martin, R. (Host). (2016, May 1). Forget Talent, Success Comes From ‘Grit’

[Radio broadcast episode]. In Sunday Edition. Washington DC: National Public 

THE RULE OF 40

THE RULE OF 40                                                                                                         

Depending on the number of words in your quote, your format may change.

If your quote is shorter than 40 words, you can integrate your quote within your paragraphs.

If your quote is 40 words or longer, you will have to start your quote in a new line and indent it. Essentially, the quote is no longer part of your paragraph and it stands out on its own.

ORIGINAL QUOTE                                                                                                         

“Grit, in a word, is stamina. But it's not just stamina in your effort. It's also stamina in your direction, stamina in your interests. If you are working on different things but all of them very hard, you're not really going to get anywhere. You'll never become an expert.” – Angela Dukworth

SHORT QUOTATION WITH IN-TEXT CITATION                                                            

In an interview about her new book, Duckworth defined grit as “… stamina. But it's not just stamina in your effort. It's also stamina in your direction, stamina in your interests” (as cited in Martin, 2016).

(19 words)

LONG QUOTATION WITH IN-TEXT CITATION                                                              

In an interview with Martin (2016), Duckworth explained:

Grit, in a word, is stamina. But it's not just stamina in your effort. It's also stamina in your direction, stamina in your interests. If you are working on different things but all of them very hard, you're not really going to get anywhere. You'll never become an expert.

                                                      (49 words)

COMPLETE CITATION                                                                                                    

Martin, R. (Host). (2016, May 1). Forget Talent, Success Comes From ‘Grit’

[Radio broadcast episode]. In Sunday Edition. Washington DC: National Public Radio.

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